Avoid Liabilty for Card Fraud

If you own an ATM

You've probably noticed new credit and debit cards with the shiny EMV chips. These chips make card transactions more secure than transitional magnetic strip technology to thwart skimming.


For ATMs to process EMV chip card transactions, new technology is needed. You may choose to upgrade field ATMs with new EMV-certified hardware and software, or replace older ATMs with brand new EMV-compliant units.

You will be held financially liable for any counterfeit card transactions

If the ATM you own is not EMV Compliant, all theft attributed to counterfeit card transactions is now the responsibility of the machine owner.


As of October 1, 2017, liability will be assigned to the party in the transaction that is using the less secure magnetic stripe technology. For ATM owners, the liability threat from even a small amount of fraud can severely compromise the viability of your business.

Learn more about the EMV Liability Shift

The National ATM Council estimates nearly one half of the 400,000 private ATMs in the US are still not EMV compliant. Review the EMV Guide to learn more about your risks and how to fix them.

How to determine if your ATM is EMV compliant

  • Select a Debit Card with an EMV Chip
  • Insert the card into your ATM
  • The card reader should "latch" and hold the card as you enter your pin
  • Complete a Balance Inquiry and ask for a receipt to confirm your account balance
  • Your card should be released after completing the Balance Inquiry